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A Discovery of Witches is the first in a trilogy by Deborah Harkness.  The trilogy is now complete with July’s publishing of The Book of Life, and the series is so consistently great that really, we think you should read all three. These books are a fantastic combination of fantasy, historical fiction, romance, suspense and adventure. Our staff member thought they were like a more accessible (and fantasy instead of science fiction) Neal Stephenson.

Deep in the stacks of Oxford’s Bodleian Library, young scholar Diana Bishop unwittingly calls up a bewitched alchemical manuscript in the course of her research. Descended from an old and distinguished line of witches, Diana wants nothing to do with sorcery; so after a furtive glance and a few notes, she banishes the book to the stacks. But her discovery sets a fantastical underworld stirring, and a horde of daemons, witches, and vampires soon descends upon the library. Diana has stumbled upon a coveted treasure lost for centuries-and she is the only creature who can break its spell.

Debut novelist Deborah Harkness has crafted a mesmerizing and addictive read, equal parts history and magic, romance and suspense. Diana is a bold heroine who meets her equal in vampire geneticist Matthew Clairmont, and gradually warms up to him as their alliance deepens into an intimacy that violates age-old taboos. This smart, sophisticated story harks back to the novels of Anne Rice, but it is as contemporary and sensual as the Twilight series-with an extra serving of historical realism” –Taken from Goodreads.com

The Library has these in regular and large type, as well as audiobooks.  Please note, the large type works are on order and should be in soon.

Stay connected: Facebook, Twitterblog and Summer.

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Al Capone Does My Shirts by Gennifer Choldenko is this week’s staff pick, chosen by one of our superb Children’s Librarians!

In this appealing novel set in 1935, 12-year-old Moose Flanagan and his family move from Santa Monica to Alcatraz Island where his father gets a job as an electrician at the prison and his mother hopes to send his autistic older sister to a special school in San Francisco. When Natalie is rejected by the school, Moose is unable to play baseball because he must take care of her, and her unorthodox behavior sometimes lands him in hot water. He also comes to grief when he reluctantly goes along with a moneymaking scheme dreamed up by the warden’s pretty but troublesome daughter. Family dilemmas are at the center of the story, but history and setting–including plenty of references to the prison’s most infamous inmate, mob boss Al Capone–play an important part, too. The Flanagan family is believable in the way each member deals with Natalie and her difficulties, and Moose makes a sympathetic main character. The story, told with humor and skill, will fascinate readers with an interest in what it was like for the children of prison guards and other workers to actually grow up on Alcatraz Island.–Miranda Doyle, San Francisco Public Library”– School Library Journal.

This book is aimed at middle school students, and is a great, interesting read for boys and girls.  It’s also the beginning of a series, so if you or your kids love it, the story continues!

We have multiple copies in print and an audiobook edition.

 

Don’t forget the Library is CLOSED Sunday and Monday (5/25 & 5/26) for Memorial Day.  Get these and other updates on our Facebook, Twitter, and/or blog.

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In The Sparrow, it’s 2019, and “humanity finally finds proof of extraterrestrial life when a listening post in Puerto Rico picks up exquisite singing from a planet which will come to be known as Rakhat. While United Nations diplomats endlessly debate a possible first contact mission, the Society of Jesus quietly organizes an eight-person scientific expedition of its own. What the Jesuits find is a world so beyond comprehension that it will lead them to question the meaning of being “human.” Words like “provocative” and “compelling” will come to mind as you read this shocking novel about first contact with a race that creates music akin to both poetry and prayer” — Goodreads.

We have it in book and audiobook format.

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To those of you celebrating the holiday, Happy Easter! We hope you have a safe and wonderful day.

If you’ll be stuck in the car on the way to Aunt Sally’s, don’t forget to bring something to keep you and your family entertained for the ride, like one of our audiobooks.

Salt: A World History by Mark Kurlansky.  Salt is about the history of salt and it’s impact on human society over the years- it has been used as currency, influenced trade routes and cities, started wars, secured empires… and more.  Sound intriguing? It is, our staffer can’t stop raving about it.  Check it out today!

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Remember to find us on Facebook, Twitter, and/or to follow our blog.

It’s the end of National Reading Month… but don’t stop reading!  Even if you don’t know what to read, come try a Staff Pick title, located at the Circulation and Reference desks and in the YA room on the display.  Many of these are also available as ebooks for loan.

The Library is also hosting a lot of wonderful programs this month like free SAT Review classes, beginner yoga, adult chess club,  showings of the films 12 Years a Slave and American Hustle, and much more.  Check out our April calendar to check out our great offerings and find out if you need to register.  Have kids? We have tons of great children’s programs too! Check it out on our Children’s April calendar.   You can always get to either via the Events tab on our homepage.

Don’t forget to find us on Facebook!

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