Join us on Saturday, May 10th at 1:30 pm in the Community Room for a discussion of The Unlikely Pilgrimage of Harold Fry by Rachel Joyce.  New members welcome!

HaroldFry

 

Meet Harold Fry, recently retired. He lives in a small English village with his wife, Maureen, who seems irritated by almost everything he does. Little differentiates one day from the next. Then one morning a letter arrives, addressed to Harold in a shaky scrawl, from a woman he hasn’t heard from in twenty years. Queenie Hennessy is in hospice and is writing to say goodbye. But before Harold mails off a quick reply, a chance encounter convinces him that he absolutely must deliver his message to Queenie in person. In his yachting shoes and light coat, Harold Fry embarks on an urgent quest. Determined to walk six hundred miles to the hospice, Harold believes that as long as he walks, Queenie will live. A novel of charm, humor, and profound insight into the thoughts and feelings we all bury deep within our hearts.  (Publisher’s Description)

Limited copies available at the reference desk.  For more information about bookclubs at FTPL please visit: bookclubs

Join us on Saturday, April 12th at 1:30 pm in the Community Room for a discussion of The Twelve Tribes of Hattie by Ayana Mathis.  New members welcome!

Hattie

 In 1923, fifteen-year-old Hattie Shepherd, swept up by the tides of the Great Migration, flees Georgia and heads north.  Full of hope, she settles in Philadelphia to build a better life.  Instead she marries a man who will bring her nothing but disappointment.  Hattie gives birth to nine children and vows to prepare them for an unkind world.  Their lives, captured in twelve luminous threads, tell the story of a mother’s monumental courage– and a nation’s tumultuous journey. (Publisher’s Description)

Limited copies available at the reference desk.  For more information about bookclubs at FTPL please visit: bookclubs

The Room by  Emma Donoghue
The Room by Emma Donoghue
Join us for a discussion of Room: A Novel by Emma Donoghue on February 21, 2012 at 7 PM in the Community Room.

To five-year-old Jack, Room is the entire world. It is where he was born and grew up; it’s where he lives with his Ma as they learn and read and eat and sleep and play. At night, his Ma shuts him safely in the wardrobe, where he is meant to be asleep when Old Nick visits. Room is home to Jack, but to Ma, it is the prison where Old Nick has held her captive for seven years. Through determination, ingenuity, and fierce motherly love, Ma has created a life for Jack. But she knows it’s not enough…not for her or for him. She devises a bold escape plan, one that relies on her young son’s bravery and a lot of luck. What she does not realize is just how unprepared she is for the plan to actually work. Told entirely in the language of the energetic, pragmatic five-year-old Jack, ROOM is a celebration of resilience and the limitless bond between parent and child, a brilliantly executed novel about what it means to journey from one world to another.

Copies will be available at the Reference Desk.

For more information on Bookclubs at Franklin Township click here.

The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks by Rebecca Skloot
The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks by Rebecca Skloot
Join us on Saturday, February 12, 2012 at 1:30 PM in the Community Room for a discussion of The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks by Rebecca Skloot.

Her name was Henrietta Lacks, but scientists know her as HeLa. She was a poor Southern tobacco farmer who worked the same land as her slave ancestors, yet her cells-taken without her knowledge-became one of the most important tools in medicine. The first immortal human cells grown in culture, they are still alive today, though she has been dead for more than sixty years. If you could pile all HeLa cells ever grown onto a scale, they would weigh more than 50 million metric tons-as much as a hundred Empire State Buildings. HeLa cells were vital for developing the polio vaccine; uncovered secrets of cancer, viruses, and the atom bomb’s effects; helped lead to important advances like in vitro fertilization, cloning, and gene mapping; and have been bought and sold by the billions. Yet Henrietta Lacks remains virtually unknown, buried in an unmarked grave. Now Rebecca Skloot takes us on an extraordinary journey, from the colored ward of Johns Hopkins Hospital in the 1950s to stark white laboratories with freezers full of HeLa cells; from Henrietta’s small, dying hometown of Clover, Virginia-a land of wooden slave quarters, faith healings, and voodoo-to East Baltimore today, where her children and grandchildren live and struggle with the legacy of her cells.

Copies are available at the Reference Desk.

For more information about bookclubs at Franklin Township Public Library please click here.