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Sadly, National Poetry Month is almost over.  Hopefully you’ve taken some time to enjoy your favorite poets or find some new ones like Rumi, Billy Collins, e.e. cummings, an anthology of poets, or one of the many other famous and not-so-famous poets we have in the collection.  Don’t like poetry?  Not a problem.  Try a novel in verse, you might be surprised at how much you like it.  Some of the novels in verse in our collection are:

  • The Marlowe Papers by Ros Barber (secret identities, faked murder, and enough drama for at least three Shakespeare plays)
  • Lies, Knives and Girls in Red Dresses by Ron Koertge (modern true stories behind fairy tales)
  • Only Revolutions by Mark Z. Danielewski (a topsy-turvy modern Romeo and Juliet tale)
  • After the Kiss by Terra Elan McVoy (two high school seniors getting through their last semester)
  • The Hunchback of Neiman Marcus by Sonya Sones (a novel of middle age, motherhood, marriage and mayhem)

… the list goes on.  Try something new this month and tell us if you like it.  You can find more on the “Something Different” bookmarks at Circulation too.  You can find Novels in Verse and Poetry books in the catalog.

Have you check our our Poets of the Week this month?

There are tons of events, support and ideas for National Poetry Month as well.  Check out some of these from ReadingRockets, ReadWriteThink & Scholastic.  The National Poetry Month official website has a lot of great resources as well including a poem a day, Dear Poet project, poem in your pocket day, and more!

Don’t forget, we always have poetry available, along with all our other great materials.

Also, do you like our haiku (see image)? Let us know!

Did you know? We’re on Twitter, Facebook, WordPress and now Pinterest.

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The incomparable Maya Angelou is this week’s Poet of the Week (in honor of National Poetry Month).  She’s been a staff pick before, and she absolutely deserves to be again.  An American author, activist, poet, dancer, actress, and singer, she published seven autobiographies, three books of essays, and several books of poetry, and was credited with a list of plays, movies, and television shows spanning over 50 years.  She was a truly impressive woman, and her writing is beautiful.

You can find out more about her poetry in particular, here.  We recommend The Complete Collected Poems of Maya Angelou, which collects her poetry through 1994.   (You can find it at: FDC 811 ANG)

Check out one of her many titles, you can see what’s available in the catalog.

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We now offer a limited number of passes (a maximum of 4) to Grounds for Sculpture in Hamilton, NJ!  Grounds for Sculpture features 42 landscaped acres with a constantly evolving collection of contemporary outdoor sculptures.

Passes are available on a first-come, first-served bases at the Adult Reference Desk at the Demott Lane location (main library). Passes cannot be reserved in advance. 

The checkout period is 4 days, and passes cannot be renewed.

The museum passes are free to borrow (unless returned late or lost). The overdue fine for museum passes is $10.00 per day, up to the full replacement cost ($405.00 as of 3/17/2015). If not returned within 14 days after the due date, the museum pass will be presumed lost and borrowers will be charged the full replacement cost ($405.00 as of 3/17/2015).

Please visit the Services section of the Library’s website or stop by the Adult Reference Desk during business hours for additional program details.

Did you know? We’re on Twitter, Facebook, WordPress and now Pinterest.

Large-Blue-RGB-National-Poetry-Month-Logo (1)

It’s National Poetry Month!  It’s time to enjoy your favorite poets or find some new ones like Rumi, Billy Collins, e.e. cummings, an anthology of poets, or one of the many other famous and not-so-famous poets we have in the collection.  Don’t like poetry?  Not a problem.  Try a novel in verse, you might be surprised at how much you like it.  Some of the novels in verse in our collection are:

  • The Marlowe Papers by Ros Barber (secret identities, faked murder, and enough drama for at least three Shakespeare plays)
  • Lies, Knives and Girls in Red Dresses by Ron Koertge (modern true stories behind fairy tales)
  • Only Revolutions by Mark Z. Danielewski (a topsy-turvy modern Romeo and Juliet tale)
  • After the Kiss by Terra Elan McVoy (two high school seniors getting through their last semester)
  • The Hunchback of Neiman Marcus by Sonya Sones (a novel of middle age, motherhood, marriage and mayhem)

… the list goes on.  Try something new this month and tell us if you like it.  You can find more on the “Something Different” bookmarks at Circulation too.  You can find Novels in Verse and Poetry books in the catalog.

Have you check our our Poets of the Week this month?

There are tons of events, support and ideas for National Poetry Month as well.  Check out some of these from ReadingRockets, ReadWriteThink & Scholastic.  The National Poetry Month official website has a lot of great resources as well including a poem a day, Dear Poet project, poem in your pocket day, and more!

Did you know? We’re on Twitter, Facebook, WordPress and now Pinterest.

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For this week’s National Poetry Month Poet-themed staff pick of the week, we are highlighting 3 prominent and very different poets.  One is the widely acclaimed Shel Silverstein, the immortal bard William Shakespeare, and the popular children’s poet Jack Prelutsky.

Silverstein is well known for his children’s poetry collections A Light in the Attic and Where the Sidewalk Ends.  You can check out these and some of his other works here.

We’re pretty sure that everyone has read at least one piece of Shakespeare’s work, or at least seen one of the many, many movies based on his work.  The Bard really needs no introduction, so we’ll just connect you to our catalog.

You may or may not know Jack Prelutsky, who writes wonderful children’s poetry like Tyrannosaurus Was a Beast.  He’s quite prolific and we have quite a few of his works in the library.

We hope you enjoy these poets of the week!  We’ll leave you with this:

Where the Sidewalk Ends

from the book “Where the Sidewalk Ends” (1974)

There is a place where the sidewalk ends
and before the street begins,
and there the grass grows soft and white,
and there the sun burns crimson bright,
and there the moon-bird rests from his flight
to cool in the peppermint wind.

Let us leave this place where the smoke blows black
and the dark street winds and bends.
Past the pits where the asphalt flowers grow
we shall walk with a walk that is measured and slow
and watch where the chalk-white arrows go
to the place where the sidewalk ends.

Yes we’ll walk with a walk that is measured and slow,
and we’ll go where the chalk-white arrows go,
for the children, they mark, and the children, they know,
the place where the sidewalk ends.

Don’t miss what’s happening at FTPL! We’re on Twitter, Facebook, WordPress and now Pinterest