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This is an easily readable novel in verse, and the staffer who read this absolutely loved this version of the Shakespeare authorship question and wishes it were true.

“On May 30th, 1593, a celebrated young playwright was killed in a tavern brawl in London. That, at least, was the official version. Now let Christopher Marlowe tell you the truth: that his ‘death’ was an elaborate ruse to avoid his being hanged for heresy; that he was spirited across the channel to live on in lonely exile, longing for his true love and pining for the damp streets of London; that he continued to write plays and poetry, hiding behind the name of a colourless man from Stratford — one William Shakespeare.

With the grip of a thriller and the emotional force of a sonnet, this extraordinary novel in verse gives voice to a man who was brilliant, passionate, mercurial and not altogether trustworthy. The son of a cobbler who rose so far in Elizabethan society that he counted nobles among his friends and patrons, a spy in the Queen’s service, a fickle lover and a declared religious sceptic, he was always courting trouble. When it caught up with him, he was lucky to have connections powerful enough to help him escape.

Memoir, love letter, settling of accounts and a cry for recognition as the creator of some of the most sublime works in the English language, this is Christopher Marlowe’s testament — and a tour de force by an award-winning poet: provocative, persuasive and enthralling.”– Taken from Goodreads.com

 

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1654

You may or may not have heard that author Terry Pratchett died this past Thursday at the age of 66.  A wonderfully imaginative author, he is best known for his Discworld novels.  We recommend one of his books as this week’s Staff Pick.  A couple staff favorites are Small Gods and Good Omens (with Neil Gaiman).   You can see what we have available in the catalog.

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The Throne of Glass series by Sarah J. Maas is this week’s staff pick of the week.   Below is the synopsis for the first book, and the series just gets better with every installment.   Our staffer says that the first book is pretty decent, the second is very good, and the third is great. Celaena is a strong, complicated heroine who develops a lot over the course of the series.  The secondary characters are also well done, and our staffer highly recommends the series for all lovers of fantasy/adventure/epic fiction.  Strongly recommended for fans of Garth Nix, Tamora Pierce, Mercedes Lackey, Robin McKinley…

The series in order so far:  Throne of Glass, Crown of Midnight, and Heir of Fire.  We also have the set of prequel stories, The Assassin’s Blade.

 

“After serving out a year of hard labor in the salt mines of Endovier for her crimes, 18-year-old assassin Celaena Sardothien is dragged before the Crown Prince. Prince Dorian offers her her freedom on one condition: she must act as his champion in a competition to find a new royal assassin. Her opponents are men-thieves and assassins and warriors from across the empire, each sponsored by a member of the king’s council. If she beats her opponents in a series of eliminations, she’ll serve the kingdom for three years and then be granted her freedom.
Celaena finds her training sessions with the captain of the guard, Westfall, challenging and exhilarating. But she’s bored stiff by court life. Things get a little more interesting when the prince starts to show interest in her… but it’s the gruff Captain Westfall who seems to understand her best.

Then one of the other contestants turns up dead… quickly followed by another.

Can Celaena figure out who the killer is before she becomes a victim? As the young assassin investigates, her search leads her to discover a greater destiny than she could possibly have imagined.” –Taken from Goodreads.com


Throne of Glass

Sarah J. Maas

Published: Jul 31, 2012 by Bloomsbury Press
Find in the Library



Crown of Midnight

Sarah J. Maas

Published: Aug 27, 2013 by Bloomsbury Press
Find in the Library



Heir of Fire

Sarah J. Maas

Published: Sep 02, 2014 by Bloomsbury Press
Find in the Library



The Assassin's Blade: The Throne Of Glass Novellas

Sarah J. Maas

Published: Mar 04, 2014 by Bloomsbury Press
Find in the Library


 

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This week’s staff pick is A Good Indian Wife by Anne Cherian.  This is a charged novel about arranged marriage and Indian culture in the 1980s, in India and America.

Handsome anesthesiologist Neel prides himself on his decisiveness, both in and out of the operating room. So when he agrees to return to India to visit his ailing grandfather, he is sure he’ll be able to resist his family’s pleas that he marry a “good” Indian girl. With a girlfriend and a promising career back in San Francisco, the last thing Neel needs is an arranged marriage.

Leila is a thirty-year-old teacher in Neel’s family’s village who has watched too many prospective husbands come and go to think her newest suitor will be any different. She is well past prime marrying age; her family has no money for a dowry; and then there’s the matter of an old friendship with a Muslim boy named Janni.

Neel and Leila struggle to reconcile their own desires with the expectations of others in this riveting story of two people, two countries, and two ways of life that may be more compatible than they seem.”–Taken from Goodreads.com


Good Indian Wife: A Novel

Anne Cherian

Published: Apr 29, 2008 by WW Norton
Find in the Library


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Water for Elephants by Sara Gruen is this week’s staff pick.  A fantastic story about love, friendship, and some of the darker things in life, all behind the glittering lights of the circus.  As it’s set in the 1930’s, there is unfortunately some animal abuse in the novel so please be prepared.

“Orphaned, penniless, Jacob Jankowski jumps a freight train in the dark, and in that instant, transforms his future.

By morning, he’s landed a job with the Flying Squadron of the Benzini Brothers Most Spectacular Show on Earth. By nightfall, he’s in love.

In an America made colourless by prohibition and the Depression, the circus is a refuge of sequins and sensuality. But behind the glamour lies a darker world, where both animals and men are dispensable. Where falling in love is the most dangerous act of all…” –Taken from Goodreads.com

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