Reading List for Women’s History Month 2021


March is Women’s History Month! This is a time set aside annually to recognize and celebrate the contributions of women to the history and culture of our country and the world. To celebrate, the library has put together a reading list and book display of books about the milestones of women’s history in the United States and elsewhere, as well as titles about contemporary women’s issues and the ongoing struggle for equality.





Here are a few standout titles from the reading list:



Hands on the Freedom Plow: Personal Accounts by Women in SNCC - Kindle  edition by Holsaert, Faith S., Prescod Norman Noonan, Martha, Richardson,  Judy, Garman Robinson, Betty, Smith Young, Jean, Zellner, Dorothy

“In Hands on the Freedom Plow, fifty-two women–northern and southern, young and old, urban and rural, black, white, and Latina–share their courageous personal stories of working for the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC) on the front lines of the Civil Rights Movement.

The testimonies gathered here present a sweeping personal history of SNCC: early sit-ins, voter registration campaigns, and freedom rides; the 1963 March on Washington, the Mississippi Freedom Summer, and the movements in Alabama and Maryland; and Black Power and antiwar activism. Since the women spent time in the Deep South, many also describe risking their lives through beatings and arrests and witnessing unspeakable violence. These intense stories depict women, many very young, dealing with extreme fear and finding the remarkable strength to survive.” -Goodreads.com



Headstrong: 52 Women Who Changed Science-and the World: Swaby, Rachel:  9780553446791: Amazon.com: Books

“In 2013, the New York Times published an obituary for Yvonne Brill. It began: “She made a mean beef stroganoff, followed her husband from job to job, and took eight years off from work to raise three children.” It wasn’t until the second paragraph that readers discovered why the Times had devoted several hundred words to her life: Brill was a brilliant rocket scientist who invented a propulsion system to keep communications satellites in orbit, and had recently been awarded the National Medal of Technology and Innovation. Among the questions the obituary—and consequent outcry—prompted were, Who are the role models for today’s female scientists, and where can we find the stories that cast them in their true light?     

Headstrong
 delivers a powerful, global, and engaging response. Covering Nobel Prize winners and major innovators, as well as lesser-known but hugely significant scientists who influence our every day, Rachel Swaby’s vibrant profiles span centuries of courageous thinkers and illustrate how each one’s ideas developed, from their first moment of scientific engagement through the research and discovery for which they’re best known. This fascinating tour reveals these 52 women at their best—while encouraging and inspiring a new generation of girls to put on their lab coats.” -Goodreads.com



Rad Women Worldwide: Artists and Athletes, Pirates and Punks, and Other  Revolutionaries Who Shaped History: Schatz, Kate, Klein Stahl, Miriam:  9780399578861: Amazon.com: Books

“In Rad Women Worldwide, writer Kate Schatz and artist Miriam Klein Stahl tell fresh, engaging, and inspiring tales of perseverance and radical success by pairing well researched and riveting biographies with powerful and expressive cut-paper portraits. Featuring an array of diverse figures from Hatshepsut (the great female king who ruled Egypt peacefully for two decades) and Malala Yousafzi (the youngest person to win the Nobel Peace Prize) to Poly Styrene (legendary teenage punk and lead singer of X-Ray Spex) and Liv Arnesen and Ann Bancroft (polar explorers and the first women to cross Antarctica), this progressive and visually arresting book is a compelling addition to women’s history.” -Goodreads.com



If you have any questions about putting any of these books on hold, please leave a comment below or message us on our chat service. For more information on Women’s History Month, please click here.

Thanks for reading!
-George, FTPL

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